Daily report by Eric Malmsten PDF Print E-mail
Written by Eric on Sat, Jul 17 2010 (00:03)

 July 16, 11:41PM

 

  The Arbiter’s Course was interesting. Stephen Boyd has had decades of experience and its interesting hearing how things are different in France.
For example, if a player doesn’t show up to a game they get suspended for
3 months -- a good idea. Hal Bond was also a great assistant, contributing examples and interpretations of the FIDE rules. We learned when and when not the arbiter can intervene. With time increments there are less time scramble issues.


 Apparently in FIDE blitz chess chopping the king is an illegal move and loses. And there was the player whose phone rang while waiting for his opponent who arrived late to win by forfeit. With a forfeit there can also be a 0-1/2 result.

We hand-paired a small tournament and I struggled with colour alteration being more important than top half versus bottom half. We also looked at calculating ratings and norms and tie-breaks, the latter used for prizes in Europe. Zeljka also demonstrated the MonRoi program.

The class of 14 took the 4-hour open-book exam and I don’t know how many passed. But it was an excellent way of learning the rules; Having a specific problem and looking up the rules.

Hans Jung played a 5-board blindfold simult and had a few blind spots, scoring 2.5-2.5.

Before the round Brian Fiedler read out his 24 question quiz. 89 players tried it. The winners were Hans Jung and Dave Lawless with 20. Hans was one of the winners at last year’s Toronto Open trivia quiz.
With 19 were Ralph Gregory, Mike Dougherty, and Brad Willis.
With 18 was Ralph McCleary.
With 17 were David Southam, Pino Verde, and Michael Barron.

The average was 11.

 
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Chess Quotes


And for the chess-player the success which crowns his work, the great dispeller of sorrows, is named "combination."

-Emanuel Lasker (1868-1941)



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